Gateways to Nature – Tyler Arboretum

May 11 – September 2, 2019

Members’ Preview, Friday, May 10, 5 – 8pm
This event is rain or shine! If it rains, we’ll move the fun indoors.
An exclusive after-hours opening celebration.
Meet the artists, bring a picnic, and enjoy a few members-only surprises!
Members: Register for the Members’ Preview here.

Exhibit Opening, Saturday, May 11. 10am – 2pm

Walk the grounds and explore the artwork. Find new ways of looking at Tyler’s landscapes, gardens, spaces, places, and views.
Bring a picnic and enjoy the grounds. Take a tour or explore on your own.

 

Gateways to Nature follows the theme “Inspired By Nature” and asks artists and makers from across our region to showcase Tyler’s majestic landscapes with a range of original works set throughout the Arboretum.

With the environment making national and international news these days, this summer, one of Delaware County’s hidden gems plans to change the ways we think about nature in art.

Beginning May 11, Tyler Arboretum asks visitors to look at nature in new ways in its outdoor summer sculpture exhibit, Gateways to Nature.

“With this exhibit we’re inviting visitors to join us on a sculptural journey around the Arboretum”, says Tyler’s Communications Manager, Gary Bloomer. “But unlike previous exhibits, this time we’re
asking visitors to suspend their beliefs as to what art is and where art is usually found and displayed.”

Working in a range of materials, from wood, metal, and masonry, the 13 artists and makers included in Gateways to Nature are:

J.D. Scott, of Williamsburg, Virginia, maker of Wind Tunnel
John Parker, Philadelphia, PA, maker of Bengal Tiger, Imperial Elk, and Flora Duet
Karen Delaney, West Chester, PA, maker of Grand Arch
Lele Galer, of Kennett Square, PA, maker of Kaleidoscope, and Passion
Lisa Fedon, of Chadds Ford, PA, maker of Safe Haven
Matthew Harris, of Perryville, MD, maker of At the Garden’s Door
Parris Bradley, of Villanova, PA, maker of Washing Nature
Roman Tybinko, of Philadelphia, PA, maker of Iconostasis
Roy Wilson and Ann Hopkins Wilson, of Plymouth Meeting, PA, makers of Prayer Wheels
Susan Benarcik, of Greater Philadelphia, maker of Conditioned to See
Vanny Channal, of Philadelphia, maker of Buck of Steel, Steel Mantis, and American Steel Eagle
Williamson College of the Trades, Media, PA, makers of Brick Gateway

For the duration of the exhibit, Tyler’s docent volunteers will lead tours on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays.
For visitors who prefer to explore alone, self-guided signage and maps will be available.

In Gateways to Nature, Tyler Arboretum invites visitors to pack a picnic and to pick a favorite piece of sculpture to spend time with while exploring nature through one of these different gateways.

This sculptural journey invites visitors to suspend their beliefs as to what art is and where art is usually found and displayed and instead, the exhibit asks visitors to see, feel, and experience the landscapes of Tyler in new ways, tempting visitors to walk through the Wind Tunnel and hear the movement of the wind, or to experience the lilacs from the perspective of the Heart Lock Gateway, while elsewhere on the grounds, steel-crafted, larger-than-life animals prowl the Pinetum.

Presenting an exciting and an alternative range of lenses, frames, vistas, portals, and thresholds through which to step, look, or refocus, the contributing artists to Gateways to Nature offer alternative experiences of art in nature.

The sculptures challenge our expectations as to what gateways are and can be, while asking us to stop, think, and to reconsider what art is as visitors explore the Arboretum and interact with the works.

  • To make a difference to the way we see things, do gateways have to be physical gates?
  • How does the landscape or the framed view seen through each sculpture change as the viewer moves left and right, up and down, or closer and farther away?
  • How does the presence of non-natural materials such as steel, glass, and brick alter or shift our perceptions as to what things belong where?
  • What place do hand-made items have in nature and how do those things change our experience of the great outdoors?
  • Do pieces of artistic, some might say artificial, sculpture impact the environment in positive ways or negative ways?

For the duration of the exhibit, our docent volunteers will lead tours on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. For visitors who prefer to explore alone, self-guided signage and maps will be available. Pack a picnic and pick a favorite piece to spend time in and explore nature through one of these different gateways.

Please note, this is an outdoor exhibit. While we make as many provisions as possible to welcome all visitors, please be aware that certain pieces of art may not be on or near level, paved surfaces.

 

 

 

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